© 2014 All Rights Reserved  |  Living Again Intervention  |  205.718.1133
Recovery is difficult but there is hope for a better and happier life.

About Addiction

What is Addiction

Once it was thought that a person was addicted to a drug only if s/he needed the drug daily or if s/he went through withdrawal symptoms (vomiting, seizures, cramps, death). This was a misconception. Many addicted people do not use drugs or alcohol daily and do not experience physical withdrawal when they stop using. The majority of addicted individuals is employed and appears to be functioning normally. Addiction is not only addiction to drugs and alcohol (substances) but includes what we call the process addictions: gambling, gaming, Internet, pornography, sexual compulsive behavior, cybersex, love, eating disorders, overspending, shopping, debt and hoarding. All addiction affects the brain. The neuro-physiological pathways are stimulated both by substances and process addictions. The functional changes can even be seen on brain scans. The result of the change to the brain is that the family starts to feel that they have lost their loved one and that they are living with a stranger. The brain can recover allowing the loved one to return to normal if the addiction stops. Depending on the intensity of the use, the functional damage to the brain can start to heal within 3-6 months. However, it is not fully complete until 2-5 years after stopping the addictive behavior. If the addiction does not stop, the functional damage will continue and become permanent. It is urgent to help the loved one get into recovery. If you would like to read more, visit the ARISE publications web page. http://www.ariseinterventionnow.com/publications.html

Signs of Addiction

A tolerance for the substance or practice that requires increasing amounts to achieve the same effect. Strong cravings for the substance or practice. Being unable to stop using the substance or practice without going through withdrawal. Loss of control over frequency and amounts of drug or substance usage. Preoccupation with the substance or practice. Inability to meet obligations to family, job, or other personal interests because of the substance or practice. Physical or psychological deterioration due to use of the substance or practice. The tendency to have addiction problems can be an inherited trait passed from parents to their children. Addiction can also co-exist with a psychiatric illness or physical disability (dual-diagnosis).

Common Myths

Common myths often prevent families from taking action: Myth 1: "The addicted individual must "hit bottom" before getting help and you are powerless to help until this happens". Truth: An addicted individual will not change until the people closest to him/her take action and motivate him/her into treatment. If s/he does hit bottom and is forced to go to treatment without support from family and friends, s/he is less likely to go into long- term recovery. Myth 2: "Putting pressure on her/him will push her/him over the edge and/or chase her/him away forever". Truth: Being anxious about hurting one's loved one or chasing her/him away is protective behavior that in the past has been labeled as enabling. We believe that it is truly protective and based only on love. However, since research has proven that long-term recovery depends on action and support by family and friends, it is important to exercise courage and commitment to motivating one's addicted loved one into treatment and recovery. Myth 3: "Families and their addicted loved ones are out of touch with one another and cannot be reconnected". Truth: Someone in the family always knows where s/he is and how s/he is doing. S/he is always updated on family information. Recovery of the addicted individual and healing of the family depends on becoming reconnected. Myth 4: "Secrets are really secret". Truth: All families keep secrets. In families struggling with addiction, there are many apparent secrets but family secrets are never really secret because of the close connections among family members. They are only secret from certain people at certain times. The secrecy is always based on protecting oneself or other from pain and loss. Once secrets can be openly shared, families can develop much closer honest bonding. Addiction always starts when a family goes through major, unpredictable or massive loss. The family unconsciously adapts to this loss in an attempt to cope. One member of the family, typically a child or grandchild (regardless of age) carries the majority of the grief and becomes addicted to lessen the pain, loss and grief. The addicted behavior and its consequences detour everyone else's attention from their own grieving so that they can move forward and maintain the survival of the family. It also keeps the family close as they concentrate on the problems. This closeness prevents further loss. If the addicted individual goes into recovery before the grieving is resolved, s/he will relapse because the family members are once again overwhelmed by their grief. If the grieving is not resolved in that first generation, one or more people in the next generation will become addicted. The more generations it takes for the grieving to be done, the more people will become addicted. In our research, we found that in all families by the 3rd or 5th generation someone in the family leads the family into healing and recovery. We call this amazing drive towards survival and healing "Family Motivation to Change" or to heal and it's present in all families. What we've learned from this is that we don't have to wait for this natural process to happen, but that we can speed up the process by helping families resolve their grief and move into healing and long-term recovery. As this happens, they realize that the secrets were all based on protecting one another from further loss and that they no longer have to be secret. Information above used with permission from http://www.ariseinterventionnow.com/addiction.html
205-718-1133 HELP AVAILABLE  24/7 office: 205 876-2478
FREE CONSULTATION
© 2014 All Rights Reserved  |  Living Again Intervention  205.718.1133

About Addiction

What is Addiction

Once it was thought that a person was addicted to a drug only if s/he needed the drug daily or if s/he went through withdrawal symptoms (vomiting, seizures, cramps, death). This was a misconception. Many addicted people do not use drugs or alcohol daily and do not experience physical withdrawal when they stop using. The majority of addicted individuals is employed and appears to be functioning normally. Addiction is not only addiction to drugs and alcohol (substances) but includes what we call the process addictions: gambling, gaming, Internet, pornography, sexual compulsive behavior, cybersex, love, eating disorders, overspending, shopping, debt and hoarding. All addiction affects the brain. The neuro-physiological pathways are stimulated both by substances and process addictions. The functional changes can even be seen on brain scans. The result of the change to the brain is that the family starts to feel that they have lost their loved one and that they are living with a stranger. The brain can recover allowing the loved one to return to normal if the addiction stops. Depending on the intensity of the use, the functional damage to the brain can start to heal within 3-6 months. However, it is not fully complete until 2-5 years after stopping the addictive behavior. If the addiction does not stop, the functional damage will continue and become permanent. It is urgent to help the loved one get into recovery. If you would like to read more, visit the ARISE publications web page. http://www.ariseinterventionnow.com/publications.html

Signs of Addiction

A tolerance for the substance or practice that requires increasing amounts to achieve the same effect. Strong cravings for the substance or practice. Being unable to stop using the substance or practice without going through withdrawal. Loss of control over frequency and amounts of drug or substance usage. Preoccupation with the substance or practice. Inability to meet obligations to family, job, or other personal interests because of the substance or practice. Physical or psychological deterioration due to use of the substance or practice. The tendency to have addiction problems can be an inherited trait passed from parents to their children. Addiction can also co-exist with a psychiatric illness or physical disability (dual- diagnosis).

Common Myths

Common myths often prevent families from taking action: Myth 1: "The addicted individual must "hit bottom" before getting help and you are powerless to help until this happens". Truth: An addicted individual will not change until the people closest to him/her take action and motivate him/her into treatment. If s/he does hit bottom and is forced to go to treatment without support from family and friends, s/he is less likely to go into long-term recovery. Myth 2: "Putting pressure on her/him will push her/him over the edge and/or chase her/him away forever". Truth: Being anxious about hurting one's loved one or chasing her/him away is protective behavior that in the past has been labeled as enabling. We believe that it is truly protective and based only on love. However, since research has proven that long-term recovery depends on action and support by family and friends, it is important to exercise courage and commitment to motivating one's addicted loved one into treatment and recovery. Myth 3: "Families and their addicted loved ones are out of touch with one another and cannot be reconnected". Truth: Someone in the family always knows where s/he is and how s/he is doing. S/he is always updated on family information. Recovery of the addicted individual and healing of the family depends on becoming reconnected. Myth 4: "Secrets are really secret". Truth: All families keep secrets. In families struggling with addiction, there are many apparent secrets but family secrets are never really secret because of the close connections among family members. They are only secret from certain people at certain times. The secrecy is always based on protecting oneself or other from pain and loss. Once secrets can be openly shared, families can develop much closer honest bonding. Addiction always starts when a family goes through major, unpredictable or massive loss. The family unconsciously adapts to this loss in an attempt to cope. One member of the family, typically a child or grandchild (regardless of age) carries the majority of the grief and becomes addicted to lessen the pain, loss and grief. The addicted behavior and its consequences detour everyone else's attention from their own grieving so that they can move forward and maintain the survival of the family. It also keeps the family close as they concentrate on the problems. This closeness prevents further loss. If the addicted individual goes into recovery before the grieving is resolved, s/he will relapse because the family members are once again overwhelmed by their grief. If the grieving is not resolved in that first generation, one or more people in the next generation will become addicted. The more generations it takes for the grieving to be done, the more people will become addicted. In our research, we found that in all families by the 3rd or 5th generation someone in the family leads the family into healing and recovery. We call this amazing drive towards survival and healing "Family Motivation to Change" or to heal and it's present in all families. What we've learned from this is that we don't have to wait for this natural process to happen, but that we can speed up the process by helping families resolve their grief and move into healing and long- term recovery. As this happens, they realize that the secrets were all based on protecting one another from further loss and that they no longer have to be secret. Information above used with permission from http://www.ariseinterventionnow.com/addiction.html
205-718-1133 HELP AVAILABLE  24/7
FREE CONSULTATION
Recovery is difficult but there is hope for a better and happier life.